One Small Step: Apollo 14
Footprint on the Moon logo
Griffith Observatory continues its celebration of NASA’s Apollo missions to the Moon with events marking the
40th anniversary of the flight of Apollo 14 and the
50th anniversary of the flight of Ham the Chimp,
the first hominid in space

Sunday, January 30 through
Sunday, February 6, 2011
  • See a real rock brought back from the Moon.

  • Hear tales of the history and plans for the future of lunar exploration from expert lecturers and Observatory staff.

  • Discover how Apollo astronauts trained under the stars in Griffith Observatory's planetarium.

  • Share your memories with friends and family.

SPECIAL LECTURES

Lectures will be held in the Leonard Nimoy Event Horizon theater. Each is free and open to the public up to the capacity of the theater.

"Ham in Space" Before people ventured into space, the trail was blazed by Ham, the Space Chimpanzee. Griffith Observatory observes the 50th anniversary of this event and  recalls Ham’s harrowing 18-minute flight aboard a Mercury-Redstone 2.

Ham in Space:
Sunday, January 30 at 3:00 p.m.

"Carting Away Cone Crater: The Story of Apollo 14"  Forty years ago, the Lunar Module Antares set down on the Moon’s Fra Mauro highlands. In this presentation by Griffith Observatory Astronomical Observer Tony Cook, we recall the adventures of America’s first Astronaut, Alan Shepard, and his crewmates Edgar D. Mitchell and Stuart A. Roosa. They struggled with health issues, balky equipment, and sheer exhaustion in an effort to explore the rim of Cone crater – before enjoying a game of golf on the lunar surface. We shall also listen to a recording of the moment when Griffith Observatory’s moon rock was collected.

Carting Away Cone Crater:
Saturday, February 5 and Sunday, February 6 at 2:00 p.m
Image of astronaut's footprint on the Moon.
 
"The Moon Landings: Hoax or No Hoax?” Were the missions to the Moon real? Did men really fly to the Moon and walk on its surface, or was it all a hoax? In the words of one astronaut, if it were a hoax, "Why would we fake it nine times?" Make your own determination after reviewing the evidence presented by Griffith Observatory Astronomical Lecturer Dr. David Reitzel.

The Moon Landings:
Wednesday, February 2 and Thursday, February 3 at 7:00 p.m.
Saturday, February 5 and Sunday, February 6 at 1:00 p.m.

"The Face of the Moon" The Moon preserves the scars of its formation and helps us understand the origin of the Earth and the solar system. Griffith Observatory Telescope Demonstrator Robert Spellman explains how samples of the Moon settled old arguments among astronomers but also posed new problems. Recent discoveries of lunar ice fuel the debate about the importance of the Moon in future space exploration.

The Face of the Moon:
Saturday, February 5 and Sunday, February 6 at 3:00 p.m.
Image of astronaut's footprint on the Moon.

LECTURE SCHEDULE

Sunday, January 30, 2011:
3:00 p.m. Ham In Space

Wednesday, February 2, 2011:
7:00 p.m. The Moon Landings: Hoax or No Hoax? Now in 3D!

Thursday, February 3, 2011:
7:00 p.m. The Moon Landings: Hoax or No Hoax? Now in 3D!

Saturday, February 5, 2011:
1:00 p.m. The Moon Landings: Hoax or No Hoax? Now in 3D!
2:00 p.m. Carting Away Cone Crater: The Story of Apollo 14
3:00 p.m. The Face of the Moon

Sunday, February 6, 2011:
1:00 p.m. The Moon Landings: Hoax or No Hoax? Now in 3D!
2:00 p.m. Carting Away Cone Crater: The Story of Apollo 14
3:00 p.m. The Face of the Moon